4-way Test

From the earliest days of the organization, Rotarians were concerned with promoting high ethical standards in their professional lives. One of the world's most widely printed and quoted statements of business ethics is The Four-Way Test, which was created in 1932 by Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor (who later served as RI president) when he was asked to take charge of a company that was facing bankruptcy.

This 24-word test for employees to follow in their business and professional lives became the guide for sales, production, advertising, and all relations with dealers and customers, and the survival of the company is credited to this simple philosophy. Adopted by Rotary in 1943, The Four-Way Test has been translated into more than a hundred languages and published in thousands of ways. It asks the following four questions:

"Of the things we think, say or do:

  1. Is it the TRUTH?
  2. Is it FAIR to all concerned?
  3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?
  4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?""
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What we do: Rotary members believe that we have a shared responsibility to take action on our world’s most persistent issues. Our 35,000+ clubs work together to: Promote peace Fight disease Provide clean water, sanitation, and hygiene Save mothers and children Support education Grow local economies
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CHARTER MEMBERS ROTARY CLUB OF BOYNTON BEACH FLORIDA MARCH 1, 1940 Roland Owen Paul Mercer Herbert Palton Nat M. Weem, Sr. M.D. Harry Benson A.V. Peterson John J. Williams Fred G. Benson Gene Merkel Jim Bowen Leslie Crane Melton Ware Curtis Wright William Stein Oscar Winchester William Plunkett Walter Lyman Homer Shelton George Henderson Roy Myers C. Howard Hood M.A. Weaver Ed Cameron- Honorary Member
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What is Rotary?
WHAT IS ROTARY On February 23, 1905 a young lawyer, Paul P. Harris, founded the first Rotary Club in Chicago, Illinois. The first Rotary Club in the world gathered together a group of five men, each of whom was engaged in a different form of service to the public. These men met in a spirit of friendship and understanding. Their meetings were held at each other’s place of business in rotation, hence the name Rotary came into being. Since that historic date, clubs have been established all over the world under Rotary International. As of the end of 2017, there are over 34,000-member clubs worldwide representing over 200 countries and over 1.2 million individuals, known as “Rotarians.” The acceptance of the principles of Rotary has been universal and the sun never sets on the ring of clubs around the world. Rotarians usually gather weekly to fulfill our first guiding principle to develop friendships as an opportunity for service. “It is the duty of all Rotarians, states our Manual of Procedure,“ outside our clubs, to be active as individuals in as many legally constituted groups and organizations as possible to promote, not only in words but through exemplary dedication, awareness of the dignity of all people and the respect of the consequent human rights of the individual. The Rotarian’s primary motto is “Service Above Self.” Rotary is a global network of 1.2 million neighbors, friends, leaders, and problem-solvers who see a world where people unite and take action to create lasting change – across the globe, in our communities, and in ourselves. Rotarians began pooling their resources and contributing their talents to help serve communities in need. The organizations dedication to this ideal is best expressed in the motto: Service Above Self.
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